Sojo University Course Syllabus

SA Course Syllabus
Syllabus for a study abroad preparation course for students taking part in language study programmes. The course is particularly inspired by Will Baker’s (2012) publication with the University of Southampton and the British Council:
Using e-learning to develop intercultural awareness in ELT: a critical evaluation in a Thai higher education setting.

It also draws on ideas from:

-IEREST (Intercultural Education Resources for Erasmus Students and their Teachers)
-Abe, Nebashi, Sasaki & Shaules (1998). Culture in Action
-Galloway, N (2015). Introducing Global Englishes
-Hockersmith & Newfields (2016). Designing Study Abroad Pre-Departure Trainings.
-Jackson, J. (2012). Education Abroad

Independent Learning Portfolio
This independent learning portfolio may be used to supplement the e-learning study abroad preparation course.

Sample Independent Learning Unit: English as a Global Language

Overview

English is not just the language of the UK and USA. It is now English is the most commonly spoken lingua franca internationally. Students are introduced to English as a global language. They look at the wide range of English speaking countries and consider some of the ways different types of English are sometimes categorised, leading to the chance to explore some aspects of ‘varieties’ of English.

Aims

To understand is a global language, not just a language of U.S.A and U.K

To understand there are different types of English use in the world

To listen to different pronunciation in English

Front page introduction

English is a global language. It is not just the language of U.S.A and U.K. It is the first language of people in more than 50 countries. It is also the most common lingua franca (国際共通語) in the world. It is estimated (推定) that 2 billion non-native speakers use English. This means there are many more non-native speakers than native speakers of English. On your study abroad, maybe you will meet native and non-native speakers. You will listen to different ways of using English. In this unit, you will complete 3 tasks. Remember to complete the mini-test and discussion board tasks after you finish.

Task 1

Video:

Watch the video: ‘The world’s English mania’ by Jay Walker. You can select Japanese subtitles if you would like.

Here is the link:

Answer these questions about the video:

  1. What 3 manias (熱狂) did he talk about at the start?
  2. What is the new mania in the world?
  3. How many people are trying to learn English in the world?
  4. What country will become the world’s largest English speaking country?
  5. What did you find interesting about the video?

Feedback

  1. Beatle mania

Sports mania

Religious mania

  • English mania
  • 2 billion
  • China

Task 2

Reading 1:

(Adapted from Global elementary textbook)

Read the text and answer the question below.

Many English words are not new to beginner English students. There are 3 reasons for this:

  1. There are many international words in English. There words are the same in many different languages. Doctor and radio are international words.
  2. Many English words are similar in other languages. Policia (Spanish), polizei (German), police (French), polizia (Italian), and police (English) are all similar.
  3. People know a lot of English words because it is connected to the world of music, travel, business, fashion or computers. For example email, hotel.

Q:

  1. What words in English are similar to Japanese words? Make a list of 10

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

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9

10

Feedback

Many katakana words are similar to English. Maybe you will understand menus in English in restaurants easy to understand!

Reading 2:

In the 5th Century, there were not many English speakers. Maybe less than 1000 people spoke English. Today, the English speaking population is about 2 billion (that’s 2,000,000,000).

For every native speaker today, there are about 4 non-native speakers (1 native speaker = 4 non-native speakers). This means most communication in English involves non-native speakers.

These circles explain different types, or ‘varieties’ of English:

An inner circle: Over 400 million native speakers in countries including Britain, the U.S.A, Canada, Austalia, New Zealand, Ireland, and South Afica.

An outer circle: At least 600 million people have learned English in countries that have a special relationship with Britain or the U.S.A. For example, Nigeria, the Philippines, Singapore, Jamaica, India, Pakistan, and more than 50 other countries.

An expanding (エクスパンディング) circle: More than 1,000 million non-natice speakers in other countries in Europe, Africa, Asia, Latin America, including Japan.

Qs:

  1. Make a list of 5 countries in the inner circle

1

2

3

4

5

  • Make a list of 5 countries in the outer circle

1

2

3

4

5

  • Make a list of 5 countries in the expanding circle

1

2

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4

5

Feedback:

Provide examples for each circle.

Task 3

The 3 circles help us organise (整理する) English as a global language. But, it is sometimes difficult to use these circles because there are many people who use English as a first language in the outer and expanding circles, and there are many people who speak English as a second language in the inner circles. There are also people who speak 2 languages as first languages, for example a child of a Japanese mother and Canadian father. That’s because many countries in the world are now multilingual (多言語の) and multicultural (多文化の). There is so much variety in English now, most people use English as a lingua franca in intercultural communication. This is a way of using English between people from different cultures who speak different first languages. Maybe there are many pronunciation (発音) differences. Maybe people use grammar that is different from the grammar rules you studied in high school. Some people think English as a lingua franca is ‘bad’ or ‘incorrect’ English because it is different from English in grammar books. This is not true. It is not realistic (発音) for British and American people to tell other people how to use English because there are more non-native speakers in the world not! Non-native speakers can use English in different ways. The most important things is understanding other people, and other people understanding you!

この3つの円は国際言語としての英語を整理するのに役立ちます。しかし、英語を母国語として話す人々がアウターサークル、エキスパンディングサークルにも多くいますし、インナーサークルには英語を第二言語として使用する人々が多くいるのでこれらの円を使うのは難しい場合もあります。また、例えば、日本人の母親とカナダ人の父親の間に生まれた子供のように二つの第一言語を話す人々もいます。現在多くの国々が多言語、多文化であるのはこのためです。英語の種類も多様化しています。多くの人々が国際共通語としての英語を異文化コミュニケーションの際に使用しています。異なる第一言語を話す異なる文化を持つ人々の間での英語使用方法です。発音が異なることもあります。高校時代に学んだ文法が異なるために、異なる文法を使う人々がいることもあります。国際共通語としての英語は文法書に載っている英語とは違うので “悪い“とか“間違っている”英語だと思っている人々もいます。しかしこれは違います。イギリス人やアメリカ人にとって英語をどのように使うのかを他の人々に教えるのは現実的ではありません。なぜなら世界には英語が母国語でない英語使用者が彼ら以上に存在するからです。英語が母国語でない人々の使用する英語は多様です。最も重要なのは他の人々を理解することであり、そうすることで他の人々はあなたを理解します!

Let’s listen to some non-native speakers speaking English.

  • There are 3 different people in these links: Person 1 is from Japan; Person 2 is from China; and person 3 is from Kazakhstan.
  • Each person reads the same text. The text is below. It is not important to understand all words in the text.
  • Listen to each person and read the text when they speak.
  • Then answer the questions below.

Person 1 (from Japan): http://www.dialectsarchive.com/japan-6

Person 2 (from China): http://www.dialectsarchive.com/beijing-1

Person 3 (from Kazakhstan): http://www.dialectsarchive.com/kazakhstan-1

COMMA GETS A CURE   Well, here’s a story for you: Sarah Perry was a veterinary nurse who had been working daily at an old zoo in a deserted district of the territory, so she was very happy to start a new job at a superb private practice in North Square near the Duke Street Tower. That area was much nearer for her and more to her liking. Even so, on her first morning, she felt stressed. She ate a bowl of porridge, checked herself in the mirror and washed her face in a hurry. Then she put on a plain yellow dress and a fleece jacket, picked up her kit and headed for work.   When she got there, there was a woman with a goose waiting for her. The woman gave Sarah an official letter from the vet. The letter implied that the animal could be suffering from a rare form of foot and mouth disease, which was surprising, because normally you would only expect to see it in a dog or a goat. Sarah was sentimental, so this made her feel sorry for the beautiful bird.   Before long, that itchy goose began to strut around the office like a lunatic, which made an unsanitary mess. The goose’s owner, Mary Harrison, kept calling, “Comma, Comma,” which Sarah thought was an odd choice for a name. Comma was strong and huge, so it would take some force to trap her, but Sarah had a different idea. First she tried gently stroking the goose’s lower back with her palm, then singing a tune to her. Finally, she administered ether. Her efforts were not futile. In no time, the goose began to tire, so Sarah was able to hold onto Comma and give her a relaxing bath.   Once Sarah had managed to bathe the goose, she wiped her off with a cloth and laid her on her right side. Then Sarah confirmed the vet’s diagnosis. Almost immediately, she remembered an effective treatment that required her to measure out a lot of medicine. Sarah warned that this course of treatment might be expensive—either five or six times the cost of penicillin. I can’t imagine paying so much, but Mrs. Harrison—a millionaire lawyer— thought it was a fair price for a cure.   Comma Gets a Cure and derivative works may be used freely for any purpose without special permission, provided the present sentence and the following copyright notification accompany the passage in print, if reproduced in print, and in audio format in the case of a sound recording: Copyright 2000 Douglas N. Honorof, Jill McCullough & Barbara Somerville. All rights reserved.

Qs:

  1. Which person was easiest to understand? Why? (write 1-2 sentences)

(box)

  • Which person was most difficult to understand? Why? (write 1-2 sentences)

(box)

  • What was different between the three speakers? (write 2-3 sentences)

(box)

Feedback:

These 3 people speak English differently. They have different pronunciation. But, they speak English well. During your study abroad, you could meet people from different countries, native speakers and non-native speakers, who speak differently. Sometimes they are difficult to understand. But, they are not speaking ‘incorrect’ English. There are so many ways to use English in the world, some people call the language ‘Englishes’.

Mini-test

Answer the following questions:

  1. How many people speak English globally? (about 2 billion)
  2. Name 3 countries in the ‘inner circle’.

1

2

3

  • Name 3 countries in the ‘outer circle’.

1

2

3

  • Name 3 countries in the ‘expanding circle’.

1

2

3

  • Describe the difference between a native speaker and a non-native speaker

Ending statement

Well done! You have now completed ILU 7. If you have any questions, please email your teacher or visit his/her office.

Now you need to complete the 5 discussion board tasks before you complete ILU 8.

Select ‘Finish’

Discussion board task

Instructions:

The purpose of this section is to answer questions and discuss your answers with your teacher and other students.

Your teacher will read your answers and other students taking this course will read your answers too.

Please read the answers from other students. You can write comments or questions if you would like!

The questions connect to ILU 7 English as a Global Language.

Please think carefully and write an answer for the questions.

Remember this is not a test of English so don’t worry about language mistakes!

There are 5 questions. It should take about 1 hour.

Discussion board task: 

  1. What ‘varieties’ of English do you know? Make a list.
  2. What ‘variety’ of English do you think Japanese students should learn? Why?
  3. What type of people do you think you will meet on your study abroad? Which other countries’ people do you think you will meet?
  4. What have you learned from this unit?
  5. How will this unit help you when you are studying abroad?
GLOSSARY